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2015-6-29

Osaka University, The University of Tokyo, and Tohoku University, in collaboration with the medical device industry, will begin the Japan Biodesign Program on October 1, 2015.

This program will begin in cooperation with Stanford University regarding the Biodesign Program and receiving assistant from MEXT’s Translational Research Network Program. Until now, development of medical devices has taken place in response to technological needs, but in this program, revolutionary medical devices and human resources that can commercialize these devices will be developed based on latent needs gathered from the medical front. In a speech at Stanford University at the end of April 2015, Prime Minister Abe announced the “Bridge of Innovation between Silicon Valley and Japan,” a new policy initiative, which was introduced as being an example of people as innovation bridges through this collaboration, with interest also on the rise in Japan. In a speech at Stanford University at the end of April 2015, Prime Minister Abe announced the “Bridge of Innovation between Silicon Valley and Japan,” and this program was introduced as an example of people as innovation bridges through this collaboration, attracting much attention from public in Japan.

Through the nurturing of the human resources who will act as innovators going forward, this program will contribute to active innovation of medical devices as well as the development of industry in Japan. In addition, the medical devices created in this program are expected to be used in the treatment of a large number of patients.

What is Biodesign?

Biodesign was started by Dr. Paul Yock and his team at Stanford University in 2001 as a program to nurture human resources who would become the driving force for medical device innovation based on design thinking. Using the needs of the medical front as a starting point, this program takes a unique approach by creating innovation while verifying development from a commercialization perspective from square one. Over the course of 13 years, this project has started over 30 companies while submitting over 400 patents. In addition, over 200,000 people have received treatment from the medical devices developed in this program, and it is currently expanding to countries around the world, including India, Singapore, and Ireland.

Overview of Japan Biodesign

The Japan Biodesign Program is led by four instructors from universities and the industrial field who have received training from Stanford Biodesign, as well as various expert instructors from the field of medical devices as well as various other industrial fields. This 1 year fellowship, in addition to programs provided by Osaka University’s Global Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, The University of Tokyo’s Medical Innovation Initiative, and Tohoku University’s Graduate School of Bioengineering, the only one of its kind in Japan, will also comprise of collaborative programs between Stanford Biodesign and the 3 universities. Expansive career paths such as medical device ventures, university research, as well product development in the business realm await those who complete this program.

Effects on Society

Through the nurturing of the human resources who will act as innovators going forward, this program will contribute to active innovation of medical devices as well as the development of industry in Japan. In addition, the medical devices created in this program are expected to be used in the treatment of a large number of patients.

Special Notes

This program is continuing its preparations through the support of MEXT’s Translational Research Network Program.

Related Link

Osaka University Global Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics
http://mei.osaka-u.ac.jp/

To see more research from this organization:

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